Notes

The five practices for “looking at” the nature of the mind are as follows:

  • Looking at the settled mind. One repeatedly looks at the mind’s still state, possibly posing questions to arouse awareness, such as “what is its nature? It is perfectly still?”
  • Looking at the moving or thinking mind. One tries to closely examine the arising, existence, and ceasing of thoughts, possibly posing oneself questions so as to better understand this process, such as “how does it arise? What is its nature?”
  • Looking at the mind reflecting appearances. One looks at the way in which phenomena of the external senses occur in experience. Usually, a visual object is taken as the subject. One repeatedly looks at the object, trying to see just how that appearance arises in the mind, and understand the nature of this process. One possibly asks questions such as “what is their nature? How do they arise, dwell, and disappear? Is their initial appearance different from how they eventually understood?”
  • Looking at the mind in relation to the body. One investigates questions such as “what is the mind? What is the body? Is the body our sensations? What is the relation of our sensations to our mental image of our body?”
  • Looking at the settled and moving minds together. When the mind is still, one looks at that, and when the mind is in motion, one looks at that. One investigates whether these two stages are the same or different, asking questions such as “if they are the same, what is the commonality? If different, what is the difference?”
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